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Apr 22

The Little Mermaid: a ballet

05:00pm

Join Ballet Theatre UK on this dramatic re-telling of Hans Christian Andersen’s all-time favourite story of The Little Mermaid

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picture of  Totem Poles

Totem Poles

Northwest Coast Canadian totem pole by Tim Paul and Richard Hunt (1979) and Community totem pole by North East carver David Gross and the local community (2006)

  • The Captain Cook Birthplace Museum Stewart Park Marton TS7 8AT
  • official website

Facilities

  • Welcome
    • Good for walkers
    • Good for school visits
    • Good for families

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Connect Tees Valley

There are two totem poles visible outside the Captain Cook Birthplace Museum.

With Nuu-cha-nulth artist Tim Paul, Pacific Northwest Native Sculptor Richard Hunt carved a 15-foot totem pole for the Captain Cook Birthplace Museum in Middlesborough, England, to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Cook’s arrival on Vancouver Island in 1978.

The wooden totem pole represents from top to bottom a thunderbird, bear and man. The thunderbird is a mythical creature which is thought to hunt whales and cause thunder and lightning. Stained in black and painted in six colours, the pole is mounted on a four-footed metal base set in concrete.

The pole was presented to the Museum by the Government and People of British Columbia in honour of Captain Cook who visited North West Canada in 1778 on his third and last voyage. It is based on two traditional carvings of the Nootka Indians of Vancouver Island. The bear appears on a pole in the abandoned village of Ehatisaht, north of Friendly Cove, which is said to be the village of Old Captain Jack's wife, a descendant of Callicum, a chief of Nootka Sound.

The second totem pole is a Community totem pole by North East carver David Gross and the local community (2006).